Recent Articles

  • Proposed U.S. Tariffs Would Hike Construction Steel Prices, Economists Say

    Article written by Tom Ichniowski on ENR.com

    If President Trump adopts Commerce Dept. recommendations to impose severe trade penalties on steel and aluminum imports from China and other foreign countries, prices for construction steel and aluminum products would jump and some contractors could suffer a financial blow, industry economists predict.

    The proposals—which Commerce sent to President Trump on Jan. 11 but didn’t release publicly until Feb. 16—include two that would apply to steel imports from all countries: a tariff of at least 24% and a quota that equals 63% of each country’s 2017 steel exports to the U.S. [View Commerce's steel report here.]

    Two other options would apply to steel imports from China, Brazil, India, Korea, Russia and seven other countries—a minimum tariff of 53% and a quota equaling 100% of their 2017 steel exports to the U.S.

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  • The Kahua Network will improve communication and productivity, enabling Crossland to deliver speed, efficiency, and quality to their clients.

    ALPHARETTA, GA. AND COLUMBUS, KAN. (PRWEB) FEBRUARY 20, 2018

    Kahua, the provider of the world's premiere collaborative network for real estate and construction project management, today announced an agreement with Crossland Companies, Inc, one of the nation's top general contractors. Under the enterprise agreement, Crossland will manage a wide variety of projects in their Construction and Heavy Contracting business units on The Kahua Network.

    Crossland is a top 100 national contractor, offering a wide range of construction services to customers across the United States. The agreement with Kahua reflects a commitment to investing in new technology to streamline operations and delivering clients the highest project value, on time and on budget.

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  • Top 10 Strategic CIO Priorities Of 2018

    Article written by Rob Preston and appears on Forbes.com

    CIOs across the globe are constantly evaluating a fusillade of emerging technologies, business models, and economic movements being fired at them. Machine Learning. Blockchain. The Internet of Things. Industry 4.0. The Subscription Economy. Autonomous Everything. Digital Transformation.

    No question, as we begin 2018 the priorities in front of CIOs are daunting, just as they were last year…and the year before that.

    But no CIO can ignore the considerable business opportunities those technology-based advances present: lower costs; more efficient supply chains; more secure networks and data stores; more dynamic and reliable products; more personalized customer service; and—if CIOs and their teams get it right—more abundant, loyal customers.

    In this, our sixth annual list of the 10 most important challenges CIOs must take on and opportunities they must seize in the coming year, you’ll notice some priorities return from last year, with important updates. As we said last year, real change doesn’t happen in tidy annual increments.

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  • Demand for Construction Workers Remains Strong, ABC Says

    According to data released Friday by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national construction industry added 36,000 net new jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis in January. Nonresidential construction employment added 16,400 net new jobs in December, mostly in nonresidential specialty trade contractors.

    Press Release from Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc (ABC)

    Full release

    WASHINGTON, Feb. 2—Today’s employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows growth in both public and private construction spending, according to an analysis by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC). Construction added 36,000 net new jobs in January, an impressive increase of 0.5 percent on a month-over-month basis.

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  • Construction Jobs Increase in 42 States in 2017

    Also, 32 States and D.C. Add Jobs Between November and December

    January 23, 2018 Press release from Associated General Contractors of America

    California & Nevada Have Biggest Job Gains for the Year, Iowa and Missouri Have Largest Declines;California and Montana Add the Most Jobs for the Month while New Jersey Loses the Most Jobs

    Forty-two states added construction jobs between December 2016 and December 2017, while 32 states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs between November and December, according to an analysis by the Associated General Contractors of America of Labor Department data released today. Association officials said a new federal infrastructure measure would help guarantee continued employment gains in the sector.

    “Construction employment is expanding in many parts of the country in large part because of strong private-sector demand,” said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. “Any new public-sector investments, particularly for infrastructure projects, would help accelerate job gains in many parts of the country.”

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  • What is the construction industry outlook for 2018?

    AGC announces that 75% of construction firms plan to expand headcount and ABC predicts stable 2018 construction economy

    Seventy-five percent of construction firms plan to expand headcount in 2018, contractors are optimistic about strong economy, tax & regulatory cuts

    Seventy-five percent of construction firms plan to expand their payrolls in 2018 as contractors are optimistic that economic conditions will remain strong as tax rates and regulatory burdens fall, according to survey results released today by the Associated General Contractors of America and Sage Construction and Real Estate. Despite the general optimism outlined in Expecting Growth to Continue: The 2018 Construction Industry Hiring and Business Outlook, many firms report they remain worried about workforce shortages and infrastructure funding.

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  • How will the final tax legislation impact the construction industry?

    Final tax legislation will lower rates for construction firms, spur economic growth and benefit construction employers for years

    December 20, 2017

    The chief executive officer of the Associated General Contractors of America, Stephen E. Sandherr, released the following statement regarding final passage of federal tax reform:

    “Today, Congress passed comprehensive tax reform legislation that will lower rates, spur economic growth and impact construction businesses for years to come. However, this process did not start as well as it ended for the construction industry. (See chart linked here for details on the final bill)

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  • Construction Jobs Numbers Rebound in November, Says ABC

    According to data released by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national construction industry added 24,000 net new jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis in November. Nonresidential construction employment added 8,600 net new jobs in November, a figure that would have been substantially higher were it not for heavy and civil engineering, which lost 7,800 for the month. In October, nonresidential construction firms shed 3,600 net positions.

    Press Release from Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc (ABC)

    Full release

    WASHINGTON, Dec. 8—The nation’s construction sector added 24,000 net new jobs in November, representing a 0.3 percent month-over-month increase, according to an Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data released today.

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  • Press Release from Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc.

    WASHINGTON, Jan. 3—Nonresidential construction spending expanded 0.6 percent in November, totaling $719.2 billion on a seasonally adjusted basis, according to an Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) analysis of data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. Despite the month-over-month expansion, nonresidential spending fell 1.3 percent from November 2016.

    Private nonresidential construction spending is down 3.1 percent year-over-year, while public sector spending has increased 1.7 percent over the same period. Spending in the manufacturing and power categories, two of the larger nonresidential subsectors, fell by a combined $21.7 billion over the past year.

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